One Squiggly Line Blog

Hand-drawn pictures can make things clear, simple, and fun in blogs, too!

Visual Thinking Words & Pictures Together

Hand-drawn visual created in real-time
increase an event's impact by:

  • allowing the audience to see what they just heard — increasing engagement and retention.

  • literally showing the audience the big picture of each talk and, when displayed together, the event as a whole. (Great for social media!)

  • providing a visual document of the day that can be shared during and after the fact...for years and years to come!

  • bringing underlying themes and patterns to the surface and deepening conversations.

Visual Notes: Sketchnotes


What exactly are sketchnotes?I define them as small-scale visual notes drawn in real-time, live or from audio or video files. Mine are usually in black-and-white. They can also be created from print materials, although those often end up being more like illustrations than sketchnotes. At least in my experience.

What's the difference between sketchnotes and illustration?The main difference between the two is the number of revisions — illustrations have many, sketchnotes have none!

The sketchnote above was drawn with an ultra fine Sharpie marker while listening to an audio file fromThe Business Soul Sessionsonline course by Beth Kempton. Sketchnotes from the course will continue to be added to thisFlickr albumandPinterest boarduntil the set is complete — close to 40 total!

Graphic Recording: Mr. Sketch Markers

VisualThinking_GraphicRecording_Drawing_Supplies_MrSketchMArkers_MelindaWalker_OneSquigglyLine

There's no denying it, Mr. Sketch Markers are just plain fun to use!

Each marker smells like either a fruit or spice. They're pretty easy to get your hands on, too. Most office supply stores carry them, as well as places like Walmart or Target. And they're a lot less expensive than fancy art markers.

They have a chisel tip that lets you draw thin or think lines, depending on how you hold the marker. Bold lines are great because people can see them from across the room. Thin lines are great, too, because they let you add some details for people to see when they're closer.

Back to the bold lines for a minute...

Working with big, bold lines is a great habit to get into. Whether you're working alone or with a group, bold lines make it much easier to see things. If you're planning to send pictures of any sketches electronically, bold lines will actually let people see what you've drawn. And that's the whole point, right?